Archeologists Uncover 5,000 Year Brewery Under Egypt

Archaeologists have uncovered the oldest known brewery in Egypt giving us a whole new perspective on the Book of Exodus. Imagining an alternative version of the Old Testament where Moses orders Pharoah to let his people go to the pub, we can’t help but wonder what they might have had on tap.

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Situated in the ancient Egyptian city of Abydos, archaeologists from Egypt and the United States uncovered the oldest known brewery in the world. Reports from The Times of Israel revealed that the venue had been brewing beer over 5,000 years ago, making it one of the earliest examples of beer culture ever discovered.

Built at the beginning of Egypt’s First Dynastic Period, during the reign of King Narmer, the brewery contained eight huge units, each one measuring 20 metres (~65ft) long and 2.5 metres (~8ft) wide. According to Mostafa Waziri, secretary-general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, each unit included roughly 40 pottery basins in two rows, which were used to heat a mixture of grains and water to produce beer.

However, unlike our modern-day breweries, which typically offer plenty of schooeys and pints to last a dynasty, the Abydos Brewery was more likely used to brew beer for royalty, with archeological evidence suggesting the beer was used for sacrificial rites and rituals.

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