17 Different Ways to Tie A Necktie

It might sound like a follow-up song to Paul Simon’s “50 Ways to Leave Your Lover,” but 17 Different Ways to Tie a Necktie is actually an indispensable guide that guarantees you won’t be the oddball at the next business meeting. You might think that rocking the no-tie look is a mark of personal expression, but the truth is that everyone in the room knows you have no clue how to tie a necktie. If you’re planning on going with a clip-on, make sure it’s a good one because clip-on ties are kind of like wigs, they only get the job done when no one can tell. Unfortunately, most of the time, people can tell.

Needless to say, a well-presented necktie is standard in every gentleman’s attire. The tying of one is an age-old tradition passed down by fathers to their sons, and in its historical development saw 17 different methods emerge, which was probably about 12 more than you were anticipating. This guide lays it all out for you so that hopefully the proud tradition of wearing a tie might continue, and that every man henceforth looks as dapper as the last. Use the chart if you don’t know how to tie a necktie, or use the chart if you do know how to tie a necktie but you’re interested in changing up your method. What’s important is that you find the approach that works best for you so that you can become one of those necktie ninjas who doesn’t spend twenty minutes in front of the mirror trying to get the length right. Impress your team at the next meeting with a new design or blend in with a classic, this list of the 17 different ways to tie a necktie does it all.

You’ll also like:
MR PORTER Suits Up with ‘The King’s Man’ Collection
20+ Best Ways to Wear a Blue Suit
10 Best Sneakers to Wear with a Suit

17 Ways to Tie a Necktie

Four in hand

1. Four In Hand Knot

Popularity: Common
Difficulty:
Easy
Size:
Small
Structure:
Uneven

Half windsor

2. Half Windsor Knot

Popularity: Common
Difficulty:
Easy/ Medium
Size:
Medium
Structure: Even

Full windsor

3. Full Windsor Knot

Popularity: Common
Difficulty:
Easy/ Medium
Size:
Large 
Structure: Even

Bow Tie

4. Bow Tie Knot

Popularity: Common
Difficulty:
Easy/ Medium
Size:
Medium
Structure: Even

Nicky

6. Nicky Knot

Popularity: Uncommon
Difficulty:
Easy 
Size:
Medium
Structure: Uneven

Kelvin

7. Kelvin Knot

Popularity: Uncommon
Difficulty:
Easy
Size:
Medium
Structure: Even

Pratt

8. Pratt Knot

Popularity: Uncommon
Difficulty:
Easy 
Size:
Medium
Structure: Uneven

Saint Andrew

9. Saint Andrew Knot

Popularity: Uncommon
Difficulty:
Easy 
Size:
Medium
Structure: Even

Balthus

10. Balthus Knot

Popularity: Uncommon
Difficulty:
Easy/ Medium
Size:
Large 
Structure: Even

Hanover

11. Hanover Knot

Popularity: Uncommon
Difficulty: 
Easy/ Medium
Size:
Large 
Structure: Even

Grantchester

12. Grantchester Knot

Popularity: Uncommon
Difficulty:
Easy/ Medium
Size:
Large 
Structure: Even

Victoria

13. Victoria Knot

Popularity: Uncommon 
Difficulty:
Easy 
Size:
Small
Structure: Uneven

Cafe

14. Cafe Knot

Popularity: Uncommon 
Difficulty:
Difficult 
Size:
Medium
Structure: Even

Eldredge

15. Eldredge Knot

Popularity: Uncommon
Difficulty:
Difficult 
Size:
Medium
Structure: Even

16. Trinity Knot

Popularity: Uncommon 
Difficulty:
Difficult 
Size:
Medium
Structure: Even

Christensen Knot

 

17. Christensen Knot

Popularity: Uncommon
Difficulty:
Easy/ Medium
Size:
Large
Structure: Even

For the beginners out there (i.e. those who don’t know how to tie a necktie), we’d say stick with the full windsor or half windsor knots. These two classic approaches will never fail you once you’ve learned them. Needless to say, no one argues with a classic look or a classic method alike. In other words: no one is judging you or presuming that you don’t know how to tie a necktie.

However, for those of you who scoff at the windsor as mere child’s play, saying it’s basically the kindergarten equivalent of knot tying, by all means step up your game. That’s right, you go right ahead and tackle one of the more difficult or lesser-known methods to prove just how far you’ve come along. If there are any other necktie ninjas at the next business meeting, trust us they’ll notice and respect that you are a master of your necktie domain.

What is a good tie for a beginner?

For the beginners out there (i.e. those who don’t know how to tie a necktie), we’d say stick with the full windsor or half windsor knots. These two classic approaches will never fail you once you’ve learned them.

What is a difficult tie to tie?

The trinity knot is up there with one of the hardest ties to tie.

What is the best tie for professionals?

We’d stick with large knots such as the the full windsor or balthus knot, however, it depends on what collar your suit shirt has.

You’ll also like:
MR PORTER Suits Up with ‘The King’s Man’ Collection
20+ Best Ways to Wear a Blue Suit
10 Best Sneakers to Wear with a Suit