Marco Lang Zweigesicht-1 with classical face

The Wind Up – Watch News #167

Happy New Year gents, and welcome to the next instalment of our weekly series covering all of the latest watch releases, The Wind Up! In this week’s round-up we’ll be covering new watches from some watchmakers that you may never have heard of before, including the likes of Marco Lang, Cramain and Cuervo y Sobrinos. Enjoy lads!

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The Wind Up – Watch News #166
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Marco Lang Zweigesicht-1

Marco Lang, formerly of Lang & Heyne, sought to reinvent himself following his departure from the brand in 2019. Focusing on getting “back to the workbench”, Marco Lang created the incredible two-faced Zweigesicht-1. Similar in concept to Jaeger-LeCoultre’s Reverso, the Zweigesicht-1 does away with the swivel-type architecture and instead incorporates a uniquely engineered detachable lug and strap system, enabling the wearer to literally flip the watch around. The Zweigesicht-1 features two beautiful yet polar opposite sides. The first is a dressy, classical and subdued affair, the second is the openworked madness that is as striking as it is intriguing.

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Cuervo y Sobrinos Flameante Historiador

Featuring ornate lugs and a stunning salmon-coloured dial with “Flameante” finishing, the Cuervo y Sobrinos Flameante Historiador is a piece that harmonises the tenets of classicism, beauty and individuality. The dial is quite stunning, accentuated by the highly detailed “Flameante” waves and offset by the clean smooth look of the sub-dial. The contrast between the rich salmon and the cold steel hands, hour markers and numerals continue the interesting aesthetic of the Cuervo y Sobrinos Flameante Historiador.

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Cramain Mark II Constant Force

Cramain was founded by Kilian Leschnik and Dr Julian M. Stiels. Leschnik, a talented watchmaker and recent graduate from a German watchmaking school, and Stiels, a Doctor of Medicine, sought to create something that was predominantly hand-made. And that they did. Of the Mark II Constant Force’s 267 components, a remarkable 235 were fully hand-made, where only the rubies, the sapphire crystals and the springs were sourced from external suppliers. The piece itself has a distinctively modern haute horlogerie look that features incredible decorative techniques like anglage, black polishing, frosting, satin finishing and circular graining. The Mark II Constant Force also features an incredibly complex 20-second remontoire, visible through the partly openworked dial.

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Damaskos Introduces an In-House Movement

In-house movements are incredibly difficult to create which is the reason why so many watchmakers source ebauche movements or calibres made in manufactures who specialise in producing mechanisms like ETA and Sellita. Damaskos’ A26 is a functional movement, designed to operate as a workhorse mechanism in lieu of elaborate finishings and decorations. It has the ability to include a date indicator or not, as well as featuring a modular movement design, meaning that components within the movement can be swapped out during servicing. Not exactly groundbreaking news, but it’s interesting to see a micro-brand like Damaskos offering in-house movements to its clients.

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If you enjoyed The Wind Up and would like to continue reading about watches, you can head on over to my blog, Haulogerie, where I delve a bit deeper into the wonderful world of horology.

VISIT HAULOGERIE HERE

You’ll also like:
The Wind Up – Watch News #166
The Wind Up – Watch News #165
The Wind Up – Watch News #164