Art

Stones Become Animals in Skilled Japanese Artist’s Hands

For the past 10 years, Japanese artist Akie Nakata, also known as the Stone Artist, has been transforming common stones into tiny animals that fit into your hands. Though, for Nakata, the stones aren’t so common. “When I find a stone, I feel that stone, too, has found me. Stones have their own intentions and I consider my encounters with them as cues they give me that it’s OK to go ahead and paint what I see on them. So the stones I decide to paint on are not arbitrary, but my significant opposites with whom I have established a connection, who inspire me to work with them.”

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Japanese Artist Turns Stones Into Tiny Animals Lion

The artwork that Nakata has created covers the range of animal life, from frogs and birds to mice and cats. Even more impressive about her talent is the ability to incorporate natural markings from the stone into her painting. The small size of her chosen canvases reveals the incredible amount of detail she has to incorporate to finish a stone. Here again, Nakata refers to the intentions of the stone. “To me, completing a piece of work is not about how much detail I draw, but whether I feel the life in the stone,” she says. Her incredible skill has built up quite a following on Instagram and Facebook, which has coincidentally blossomed into quite a business for her as well.

Japanese Artist Turns Stones Into Tiny Animals dog

“In my encounters with the stones and in my animal drawings, I respect my opposites in toto, so I never process stones and would never cut off an edge to alter the shape,” says Nakata. “The art I want to create is a life newly born in my hands through my dialogue with the stone. I want to paint the life I feel inside the stone. I consider my work completed only when I see that the eyes are now alive and looking back straight at me.” When you see the stones for yourself, you’ll understand exactly what she means.

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Japanese Artist Turns Stones Into Tiny Animals tiger

Japanese Artist Turns Stones Into Tiny Animals dove

Japanese Artist Turns Stones Into Tiny Animals owl

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