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Nissan

1 of 28 Nissan GT-R ‘T-Spec’ Could Fetch $1-Million

That's more than $500,000 over sticker.

The Nissan GT-R T-Spec was the swansong for the R35 chassis in Australia.

Only 100 were produced globally, and just 28 of these models ever landed Downunder, all of which were snapped up by buyers looking to get their hands on the last of a dying internal combustion breed. And with a history to back up the badge name that is as strong here as it is anywhere else in the world thanks to years of racing pedigree, we’re not surprised the reception for the machine was as enthusiastic as ever.

While rumours still swirl around the release of the next-generation GT-R R36, the T-Spec perfectly bridges the gap between Nismo and Premium variants with a host of features unavailable on the standard model. Most striking are the forged RAYS 20-inch wheels, wrapped in Dunlop SP Sport Maxx performance tyres and finished in gold. On the upper body, the colour choice was simple for many owners as the famous ‘Millenium Jade’ colour returned for the first time since it last farewelled the R34 GT-R almost 20-years ago. Jet Black, Midnight Purple, and Pearl White also returned in limited numbers.

Nissan GT-R T-Spec Production Numbers (Australia)
Millennium Jade 13
Jet Black 6
Midnight Purple 6
Pearl White 3

Numbers courtesy of gtr-registry.

Outside of the visual upgrade, T-Spec vehicles were treated to a host of mechanical upgrades, including a set of carbon-ceramic rotors from the Nismo model, measuring in at 410mm front (20mm bigger) and 390mm rear (10mm bigger). There’s a gorgeous carbon-fibre rear wing out the back, and the cabin is finished in a mixture of dark green, quilted Alcantara and suede on the A-pillar trim.

The T-Spec GT-R’s drivetrain remains unchanged with the twin-turbocharged 3.8-litre V6 engine still producing the same 419kW @ 6800rpm and 632Nm of torque @ 3300rpm. Power is sent to all four wheels via a six-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission that helps the car reach 0-100km/h in just 2.7 seconds.

Nissan gt r t spec australia for sale

Image: carsales

4 of 28 Australian Delivered Nissan GT-R ‘T-Spec’ Already Up for Sale

Pricing is simply irrelevant for supercars produced in such limited numbers as the T-Spec GT-R. If you have the chance to buy one and the time and patience to sell one you should always jump at the opportunity. Listing a car at roughly $500,000 over sticker might sound like an absurd move, but considering the current market and the way used car prices continue to jump month to month we don’t think it’s as crazy as it seems. Even if it’s just to grab the eyes of a potential buyer.

Nissan GT-R Pricing Australia

  • 2022 Nissan GT-R Premium: $193,800
  • 2022 Nissan GT-R Premium Luxury: $199,800
  • 2022 Nissan GT-R T-Spec: $256,700
  • 2022 Nissan GT-R Nismo: $378,000
  • 2022 Nissan GT-R Nismo SV: $393,800

The T-Spec sits comfortably in the middle of the range, and at a $60,000 price jump over the ‘Premium Luxury’, it presented savvy buyers the opportunity to cash in on their investment should they secure one for themselves. As it stands at the time of writing, 4 of 28 Australian delivered Nissan GT-R T-Specs are currently up for sale and with market prices landing anywhere between a soft-serve short of $1,000,000 and $550,000 we’re hardly going out on a whim to say these cars will return a minimum $200,000 to their respective owners. Not a bad return on investment, but we’d still rip a few laps on the track before cashing in.

One particular seller is offering the “GTR TS” plates in all their cringe JDM plate glory for a staggering $100,000, or hand the seller an extra $50,000 on top of the $1-million asking price and they’ll throw them in. How gracious.

*The vehicle pictured is currently asking AU$549,999 at the time of writing.

Check it out

Nissan gt r t spec australia front end

Image: carsales

Nissan gt r t spec rear end for sale

Image: carsales

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JOURNALIST

Ben McKimm

Ben lives in Sydney, Australia. He has a Bachelor's Degree (Media, Technology and the Law) from Macquarie University (2020). Outside of his studies, he has spent the last decade heavily involved in the automotive, technology and fashion world. Turning his passion and expertise into a Journalist position at Man of Many where he continues to write about everything that interests the modern man. Conducting car reviews on both the road and track, hands-on reviews of cutting-edge technology and employing a vast knowledge in the space of fashion and sneakers to his work. One day he hopes to own his own brand.